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Inside Club Quarantine, the 'online queer party' on Zoom

"Tanja Frewin" (2020-04-01)


<stronghip-hop<\/strong>嘻哈街舞裤" style="max-width:400px;float:left;padding:10px 10px 10px 0px;border:0px;">Bars and nightclubs are closed around the world, but when people want to party and mingle, they'll find a way.

Enter Club Quarantine, a virtual nightclub and 'online queer party' that's popped up on the video conferencing platform Zoom.

Here, every night of quarantine from 9 p.m. to midnight, hundreds of young queer people gather for a fun time that includes music, dancing, dressing up, flirting, and more.






Somewhere to hang: Club Quarantine , a virtual nightclub and 'online queer party' has popped up on the video conferencing platform Zoom







A bit of fun: Every night, 300-400 people show up on Zoom to listen to music, dance, and dress up


According to The Cut, Club Quarantine is the brainchild of four young people in their 20s who live in Toronto.

Digital creator Mingus, musician and DJ Casey MQ, comedian and producer Brad, and recording artist Andrés were spending an early night of quarantine video-chatting with each other on Instagram.

They soon realized they could have more people join them on Zoom and quickly opened up their party to more people.

More and more joined, eventually growing to 300 to 400 people a night, living in places across the US, Europe, and South America.

It's grown so big that supermodel Kiko Mizuhara and actress Hunter Schafer have joined, and Swedish singer Robyn has Instagrammed about it.






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Ingenuity: Four 20-somethings from Toronto (not pictured) started the club and enlist local acts to play







Celebrity guests: Charli XCX has even DJed a set at the 'club'


The foursome pay Zoom $160 a month to keep the party going for up to 1,000 people at a time. 

Club Q, as they call it, has a lot of things going for it: People can meet and connect, and if they find someone they like, they can go off into private chats.

They can drink and dance, and DJs come on to play music.  

'We really like to make sure we are uplifting local underground artists that we love and are super excited about,' said Casey. 

'We have so much from our own community to pick from. We have an abundance of talent, from Toronto alone. From our own personal network,' said Andrés.* 






Nightlife: Some people tune in with roommates or partners at home, while others have found it's a great way to meet people — virtually







'When you trap queer people in a box for a day and they have three hours where they know they're going to be seen by like 400 people, they're going to put on a show,' said a founder


They've even had Charli XCX play a set, which helped put them on the map.

'The next day we woke up to a fully functional and realized internet party,' said Mingus. 

What's more, it give partygoers who are stuck inside in sweats all day a chance to dress up and look their best.

'When you trap queer people in a box for model a day and they have three hours where they know they're going to be seen by like 400 people, they're going to put on a show,' said Mingus.  



Read more:

Club Quarantine Is Zoom's Hottest New Queer Club