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It really depends on what kind of shot you're looking to get.

"Timothy Sainthill" (2019-12-19)


You also can't change focal lengths on your camera with any lenses that don't shirt factory (www.jddhcfsb.com) internally zoom. First, you cannot change focus during a shot - the rig requires two hands to operate and pulling focus during a shot doesn't shirt supplier work, unless you also add on a very expensive follow-focus system. If you're shooting interviews, they are a must have.

This is by no means a deal breaker in their everyday use, but you need to remember every time you set the camera up takes time and increases the length and complexity of your production. A tripod offers the most stable and professional results in your shots. I think for most shoots, a monopod is really your best blend between stability, portability, t shirt printing dubai price, and flexibility.

One huge advantage though is you are extremely mobile, and you do get some stability in your shots. Finally, the fourth shot is another example of what you might see in a CrossFit-style video, following athletes across the gym. Here I'm tracking the action and moving the camera backwards to keep the subjects in frame.

The second shot is a wide shot that the athletes walk across, no camera movement. The first shot is basically just a pan, starting on our athletes and then following them, with the camera in a fixed position. The setup here is a Nikon D750, Tamron 24-70 2.8, shooting at 23.9 FPS, 1/50th, f5.6, ISO 800.

So what I'm showing here is each stabilizer going through a series of shots. For me, it is tough to beat the versatility of zooms like the Nikon 200-400 f/4 for shooting big field sports like this. Sometimes you can do that with gigantic lenses, other times you just need to still be physically close to where the action is going to be, and hope everything lines up just right.

Ironically, the first mainsite image I got during the 2016 CrossFit Games, was taken with the 70-200 in the soccer field, not one of the $7000 prime lenses. It requires a lot of patience and a bit of luck, and you can nail some killer shots. With a prime in the Soccer Stadium though, setup on the sidelines, you might only really be able to fill the frame with one or two lanes of athletes, limiting your section for that perfect shot.

Nailing the shot in camera is that much more important. Further, you're going to get the best possible bokeh, whereas if you crop into the image, you're not going to get any additional quality in those out of focus areas. When I shoot, I want to do the best I can to fill the frame in the camera and leave as little cropping as possible for post.

While I absolutely love shooting with primes in the gym environment - the Sigma 35 1.4 to be specific - I find the big primes extremely restrictive and challenging in big field sports.