The FUTURE OF GROW WITH FOOD AND WATER

WHO OWNS THE WATER AND DO WE NEED WATER GOVERNANCE?

Authors

  • João FEA, Pontifical Catholic University of Sao Paulo
  • Maria Cristina FEA, Pontifical Catholic University of Sao Paulo

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.23925/2179-3565.2021v12i3p48-58%20

Keywords:

Water Governance, ; Agricultural Practices, Food, Climate Change

Abstract

The permanent conflict between the search for food for the needs of society and the use of existing resources for production is frequently noticed because of advances in communication, statistical and surveys on the subject and the numbers of malnourished people in the world. Drought represents a major long-term challenge for land and water management, locally and globally, and hinders efforts to reduce poverty and hunger. The problems that justify this conflict are diverse. Studies point to causes for inadequate agricultural practices, such as excessive irrigation and deforestation, especially in scarce water ecosystems. Significant changes in water quantity and quality are evident across the world. These impacts and the changes present an ongoing risk to coupled human and natural systems and related ecosystem services. The climate change, increased production, population growth and increased consumption are justifications for the inappropriate use of water. Factors of urbanization, such as the construction of buildings, the need for a combustion vehicle for locomotion and transportation of goods, and the growing increase in paved streets, are other reasons for the loss of water. The forecasts for the next two decades is shortage of water and food, particularly in developing economies. Future growth with food and water depends on changes in guidance on how to use water in a variety of personal and production activities. This article proposes analyze this question, amplified with identification of waters owner and create a policy for the management of water.

References

BALDINI, L. UK summers temperatures reaching 40°C could be common by 2100. World Economic Forum, 2020. Available in: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/07/climate-change-summer-temperatures-uk-2100/

CASTELO, J. In Water Crisis: What is the Percentage of Drinkable Water on Earth? Updated: World Water Reserve – WWR, 2020.

ETHIOPIA AND EGYPT ARE FIGHTING FOR WATER FROM THE NILE. 01/09/2020. Global 3000. Available in: https://www.dw.com/de/%C3%A4thiopien-und-%C3%A4gypten-streiten-um-nil-wasser/av-51939577

FAO. The future of food and agriculture, Alternative pathways to 2050. FAO, 2018. Available in: http://www.fao.org/3/CA1553EN/ca1553en.pdf

LALL, U., T. et al. Water. In Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States: Fourth National Climate Assessment, Volume II Reidmiller, D.R., et al. (eds.)]. U.S. Global Change Research Program, Washington, DC, USA, 2018 pp. 145–173. DOI: 10.7930/NCA4.2018.CH3

MISACHI, J. What Percentage of the Earth's Water Is Drinkable? World Atlas, 2018.

OECD. Water Governance in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Multi-Level Approach. OECD Studies on Water, 2012.

SANTOS, J. A.; AMORIM, M. C. S.; GUEVARA, A. J. H. Water governance: the future of growth with food and water. RISUS - Journal on Innovation and Sustainability 2017 Vol 8, No 3.

SILVERIO D. et al. Queimadas na Amazônia em 2019 seguem o rastro do desmatamento. IPAN. Brazil, 2019. Available in: https://ipam.org.br/queimadas-na-amazonia-em-2019-seguem-o-rastro-do-desmatamento/

TUNISIA: Water as a luxury good. 06/06/2020. Global 3000. Available in: https://www.dw.com/de/tunesien-wasser-als-luxusgut/av-54028786

Downloads

Published

2021-11-02